Field Notes

Pepper of the Week: Morita Pepper

The Morita Pepper is one of the most popular chili peppers in Mexican cuisine. Typically used died, Morita chili peppers pack a lot of heat. While Morita chili peppers have a kick, they back up the bite with a ton of flavor.

Morita Pepper

A Morita pepper has a nutty profile that boasts a lingering smoky afterbite. Popular with the Aztecs and with a long line of fanatics today, let's shed the spotlight on the Morita Pepper. 

What is a Morita Pepper?

Morita chili peppers received their name as a loose Spanish translation to "pepper black berry." Many liken their looks to that of a mulberry. These resemblances are much in thanks to the dried chilies' dark red/purplish hue. Like the mulberry, the Morita has a bit of a sweet flavor. This fruity nuance bursts through the initial heat you experience when biting into a Morita pepper. 

While it may look like a berry and have citrusy nodes, the Morita Pepper is actually a member of the jalapeño family. These fruits develop their chocolate-like aromas when they passed the ripening stage, becoming red. At its highest heat, the Morita pepper can boast a Scoville level of 10,000 SHU. 

How to Use a Morita Pepper?

Being such a celebrated staple of the Mexican community, you can use the Morita pepper in a litany of tantalizing dishes.

Morita chili peppers are typically used in:

🌶 Moles

🌶 Stews

🌶 Hot Sauce

🌶 Salsas

🌶 Adoboes

🌶 Soups

As you can see, the versatile flavors of the Morita pepper offer this fruit as a great accompaniment to any dish. Here are some of our favorite recipes involving the Morita pepper.

Pork Tenderloin

with Morita Chili Pepper Salsa

Pork and salsa? This is an authentic Mexican dish made to make your mouth-water. The spiciness and fruitiness of the salsa bring great balance to the juicy pork tenderloin. Check out the recipe courtesy of Que Rica Vida.

Pork Tenderloin

🌶 8 Morita Chili Peppers
🌶 3 Garlic Cloves
🌶 2 cups of Water
🌶 1 tsp Ground Black Pepper
🌶 1 tsp Ground Cumin
🌶 2 tsp Powdered Seasoning
🌶  Sea Salt, if necessary
🌶 3 lbs Pork Tenderloin
🌶 1 T Olive Oil
🌶 6 Slices of Pineapple

Get the recipe via Que Rica Vida.

Smoky Spicy Amaretto

After a long day, a stiff drink is much needed. A great way to unwind is to sweat out the stress. Enjoy the decompression process with this biteful, spiteful, and delightful drink! Courtesy of Well Preserved

Amaretto

Ingredients:

🌶 Chili Syrup
🌶 1 cup of Sugar
🌶 2-3 Dried Morita Peppers 
🌶 1.5 ounces Amaretto 
🌶 1 ounce Chili Syrup 
🌶 1 ounce Lemon Juice
🌶 Ice
🌶 Thin Slices of Lime, Lemon, Morita Peppers

Get the recipe via Well Preserved

Celebrate the Morita Pepper

Can't get enough of the Morita pepper? We don't blame ya one bit! That's why it's our Pepper of the Week. Join us on Instagram @TheChiliLab. We'll cover all things Morita Pepper including how to make your own hot sauce. 

Want to take your love for food to the next level. Try our DIY Hot Sauce Kit. This Hot Sauce Making Kit has everything you need from bottles, strainers, to chili flakes. Artisan hot sauce...but homemade!

 

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Last week, we told you about our Hot Sauce Field Guide, and this week we’re excited to share a little bit more of the magic. In creating this book, we tested dozens and dozens of chile condiments, from relishes and pastes to sauces and rubs. This recipe, an easy take on classic Oaxacan mole, emerged as one of our very favorites.

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Grilled Halloumi with Sweet Morita Sauce

Though it may not seem like it, the bones of this dish are based on the classic summer salad, caprese. Seared halloumi, a fresh sheep’s milk cheese, is subbed for mozzarella, zesty tomatillos replace tomatoes, and a sweet, spicy sauce of morita chilies brings the dish together.

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The Morita Chili Pepper

The size of a prune, this dried, smoky chili is the precocious little sibling to the chipotle. Moritas are made by letting red jalapeños ripen and dry on the vine. They’re then harvested and lightly smoked. The result is a chili with fruity acidity, a touch of smoke and a soft, thick flesh. Use it anywhere you’d use a chipotle; moritas offer a similar, but milder flavor.

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