Field Notes

The Habanero Chili Pepper

When we taste and cook with chili peppers, heat is usually just one of many factors that we take into consideration. But with the habanero, heat is the name of the game. This fiery little chili, grown predominantly in the Caribbean, is impressively hot. But that doesn’t mean you should pigeonhole it for salsas and leave it at that. Behind its heat, the habanero has beautiful tropical notes and presents a worthy challenge to curious cooks.

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The Cascabel Chili Pepper

Plump and squat, this Mexican chili is better known by its nickname: the rattle chili. With just a short constrained blip of heat upon first tasting, this is a great chili for braises, soups and stews; longer cook times will coax out its full-bodied woodsy flavor.
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The Pequin Chili Pepper

The pequin chili, native to Mexico and grown frequently in other parts of Central and South America, is proof of the adage that big things come in small packages. This petite chili has an unbeatable suite of flavor--citrus, smoke and toasted nuts--and a powerful kick of heat.

Sourcing: Dried pequin chilies can be found in Latin American markets or online. They’re also easy to grow, and seeds are readily available at seed supplies like this one.

Storing: Whole dried chilies should be kept sealed in an airtight container and free of moisture.

Pairing:

  • Avocado
  • Lobster
  • Tropical fruits, such as pineapple and mango
  • Cucumber
  • Lemon
  • Sour Cream
  • Eggs

This week:

  • Pequin Caramel Brownies on Wednesday
  • Pequin Inspired Cocktails on Friday

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    The Chili Pepper Field Guide is a growing knowledge base exploring the diverse flavors of chili peppers from around the world. We welcome your thoughts and content suggestions via email or social media using hashtag #chililab

    The Chipotle Chili Pepper

     

    This distinctive and popular chili is like barbecue in vegetable form: smoky and earthy with a rich caramelized sweetness, it works beautifully in partnership with grilled dishes, or as a component of soups and stews.

    Sourcing: Grown in the American Southwest, chipotles are easy to find in dried form--check your local gourmet market, such as Whole Foods, or Latin market. They’re also commonly found canned in adobo sauce.

    Storing: Whole dried chilies should be kept sealed in an airtight container and free of moisture. Canned chiles can be kept indefinitely.

    Pairing:

    • Beans
    • Chicken
    • Corn
    • Sweet Potatoes
    • Red Onion
    • Tomatoes
    • Chocolate
    • Eggplant
    • Eggs

    Check back for recipes and images or follow us on social media to get reminders.

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      The Chili Pepper Field Guide is a growing knowledge base exploring the diverse flavors of chili peppers from around the world. We welcome your thoughts and content suggestions via email or social media using hashtag #chililab

      The Aji Amarillo Chili Pepper

       

      This enchanting pepper hails from South America--most recognizably from Peru, where it is the go-to chili for traditional recipes. When fresh, the chili is bright yellow in color (thus, the name) and frequently made into a paste to flavor sauces and stews.

      Sourcing: Most Latin markets will have dried whole aji amarillo chilies or aji amarillo paste. You can also find them in specialty online markets like this one.

      Storing: Whole dried chilies should be kept sealed in an airtight container and free of moisture. Aji amarillo paste should be refrigerated after opening.


      Pairing:

      • Pineapple
      • Pork
      • Mint
      • Cilantro
      • Coconut
      • Lamb
      • Broccoli

      Our Recipes:

      Check back for recipes and images or follow us on social media to get reminders.

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        The Chili Pepper Field Guide is a growing knowledge base exploring the diverse flavors of chili peppers from around the world. We welcome your thoughts and content suggestions via email or social media using hashtag #chililab